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Online payday loan company forced out of Missouri | FOX2now.com

ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI) – A South Dakota based online lender agrees to stop doing business with Missouri consumers. Attorney General Chris Koster is forcing the payday loan company out of Missouri.

As many as 6,300 Missouri consumers are victims. Each applied for online loans with one or more of the 8 operations run by a single individual.

Martin “Butch” Webb was doing business from a Native American reservation in South Dakota. The computer loans are short term with outragious fees and requires the consumer agree to wage garnishment if needed to ensure payback. Now, the lender must pay $270,000 in restitution and immediately stop collecting on outstanding loan payments.

Koster said Martin A. “Butch” Webb acted through numerous business entities operating from a Native American reservation in South Dakota, including Payday Financial, Western Sky Financial, Lakota Cash, Great Sky Finance, Red Stone Financial, Big Sky Cash, Lakota Cash, and Financial Solutions, none of which were licensed to do business in Missouri.

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[…]

8 On Your Side: Bill could remove payday loan protections

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LAS VEGAS – Taking out a payday loan is rarely a good idea. Many companies charge high interest rates, and customers can easily get in a trap where they spend years paying off the loans.

If you get a payday loan, be warned. These companies may soon have more leverage over customers. Nevada law offers consumers some protections from payday loan companies, but that could change.

If Senate Bill 123 passes, it would allow payday loan companies that offer long-term loans to sue customers who default on their loans.

“Somebody can get sued after paying for twelve to fourteen months on this loan, and then get sued at the end for more interest,” said consumer advocate Venicia Considine.

Considine says this can hurt payday loan customers who are already strapped for cash.

“The average income nationally of people who go to payday loan lenders is about $22,400 a year,” she said.

Considine says she feels the current laws obligate lenders to ensure anyone they give money to can pay it back. Senate Bill 123 would change that, and it could keep people trapped in a cycle of debt for a long time.

“It’s a lose-lose for the consumer,” she said.

You can voice your opposition to the bill by contacting your state lawmaker.

If you are in trouble with payday loans, the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada can help. Their services are free.

If you have a problem you want investigated, contact 8 On Your Side at 702-650-1907.

[…]

Payday Loans Are Bleeding American Workers Dry. Finally, the …

We’ve all seen the ads. “Need cash fast?” a speaker asks. “Have bad credit? You can get up to $1,000 within 24 hours.” The ad then directs you to a sketchy-sounding website, like 44cash.com, or a slightly-less-sketchy-sounding business, like PLS Loan Store. Most of us roll our eyes or go grab another beer when these commercials air. But 12 million people a year turn to payday lenders, who disguise the real cost of these loans. Borrowers often become saddled with unaffordable loans that have sky-high interest rates.

For years, states have tried to crack down on these deceptive business practices. Now, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is giving it a shot. On Monday, the New York Times reported that the CFPB will soon issue the first draft of new regulations on the $46 billion payday-lending industry. The rules are being designed to ensure borrowers have a better understanding of the real cost of payday loans and to promote a transparent and fair short-term lending market.

On the surface, payday loans sound like a good idea to many cash-strapped Americans. They offer a short-term loan—generally two weeks in length—for a fixed fee, with payment generally due on the borrower’s next payday. The average borrower takes out a $375 two-week loan with a fee of $55, according to the Pew Charitable Trust’s Safe Small-Dollar Loans Research Project which has put out multiple reports on payday lenders over the past few years. But payday lenders confuse borrowers in a couple of ways.

First, borrowers are rarely able to pay back their loans in two weeks. So they “roll over” the payday loan by paying just the $55 fee. Now, they don’t owe the $375 principal for another two weeks, but they’re hit with another $55 fee. That two-week, $375 loan with a $55 fee just effectively became a four-week, $375 loan with a $110 fee. If, after another two weeks, they still can’t repay the principal, then they will roll it over again for yet another $55 fee. You can see how quickly this can spiral out of control. What started as a two-week loan can last for months at a time—and the fees borrowers incur along the way end up dwarfing the principle. Pew found that the average borrower paid $520 in fees for the $375 loan, which was rolled over an average of eight times. In fact, using data from Oklahoma, Pew found that “more borrowers use at least 17 loans in a year than just one.”

Second, borrowers are often confused about the cost of the loan. The $55 fee—payday lenders often advertise a fee of $15 per $100 borrowed—sounds like a reasonable price for a quick infusion of cash, especially compared to a credit card with a 24-percent annual percentage rate (APR). But that’s actually an extremely high price. Consider the standard two-week, $375 loan with a $55 fee. If you were to roll that loan over for an entire year, you would pay $1,430 in fees ($55 times 26). That’s 3.81 times the original $375 loan—an APR of 381 percent.

Many borrowers, who badly need money to hold them over until their next paycheck, don’t think about when they’ll actually be able to pull it back or how many fees they’ll accumulate. “A lot of people who are taking out the loan focus on the idea that the payday loan is short-term or that it has a fixed $55 fee on average,” said Nick Bourke, the director of the Pew research project. “And they make their choice based on that.”

Lenders advertise the loans as a short-term fix—but their business model actually depends on borrowers accruing fees. That was the conclusion of a 2009 study by the Federal Reserve of Kansas City. Other research has backed up the study’s findings. “They don’t achieve profitability unless their average customer is in debt for months, not weeks,” said Bourke. That’s because payday lending is an inefficient business. Most lenders serve only 500 unique customers a year, Pew found. But they have high overhead costs like renting store space, maintaining working computers, and payroll. That means lenders have to make a significant profit on each borrower.

It’s also why banks and other large companies can offer short-term loans at better prices. Some banks are offering a product called a “deposit advance loan” which is nearly identical to a payday loan. But the fees on those loans are far smaller than traditional payday loans—around $7.50-$10 per $100 loan per two-week borrowing period compared with $15 per $100 loan per two-week period. Yet short-term borrowers are often unaware of these alternatives. In the end, they often opt for payday loans, which are much better advertised.

The CFPB can learn a lot about how to (and how not to) formulate its upcoming regulations from state efforts to crack down on payday lenders. Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have implemented restrictive rules, like setting an interest-rate cap at 36 percent APR, that have shutdown the payday-loan business almost entirely. Another eight states have created hybrid systems that impose some regulations on payday lenders, like requiring longer repayment periods or lower fees, but have not put them out of business. The remaining 28 states have few, if any, restrictions on payday lending:

The CFPB doesn’t have the power to set an interest rate cap nationally, so it won’t be able to stop payday lending altogether. But that probably shouldn’t be the Bureau’s goal anyways. For one, eliminating payday lending could have unintended consequences, such as by driving the lending into other unregulated markets. In some states, that seems to have already happened, with payday lenders registering as car title lenders, offering the same loans under a different name. Whether it would happen on a large scale is less clear. In states that have effectively outlawed payday lending, 95 percent of borrowers said they do not use payday loans elsewhere, whether from online payday lenders or other borrowers. “Part of the reason for that is people who get payday loans [are] pretty much mainstream consumers,” Bourke said. “They have a checking account. They have income, which is usually from employment. They’re attracted to the idea of doing business with a licensed lender in their community. And if the stores in the community go away, they’re not very disposed towards doing business with unlicensed lenders or some kind of loan shark.”

In addition, borrowers value payday lending. In Pew’s survey, 56 percent of borrowers said that the loan relieved stress compared to just 31 percent who said it was a source of stress. Forty-eight percent said payday loans helped borrowers, with 41 percent saying they hurt them. In other words, the short-term, high-cost lending market has value. But borrowers also feel that lenders take advantage of them and the vast majority want more regulation.

So what should that regulation look like? Bourke points to Colorado as an example. Lawmakers there capped the annual interest payment at 45 percent while allowing strict origination and maintenance fees. Even more importantly, Colorado requires lenders to allow borrowers to repay the loans over at least six months, with payments over time slowly reducing the principal. These reforms have been a major success. Average APR rates in Colorado fell from 319 percent to 129 percent and borrowers spent $41.9 million less in 2012 than in 2009, before the changes. That’s a 44 percent drop in payments. At the same time, the number of loans per borrower dropped by 71 percent, from 7.8 to 2.3.

The Colorado law did reduce the number of licensed locations by 53 percent, from 505 to 238. Yet, the number of individual consumers fell just 15 percent. Overall, that leads to an 81 percent increase in borrowers per store, making the industry far more efficient and allowing payday lenders to earn a profit even with lower interest rates and a longer repayment period.

Bourke proposes that the CFPB emulate Colorado’s law by requiring the lenders to allow borrowers to repay the loans over a longer period. But he also thinks the Bureau could improve upon the law by capping payments at 5 percent of borrower’s pretax income, known as an ability-to-repay standard. For example, a monthly payment should not exceed 5 percent of monthly, pretax income. Lenders should also be required to clearly disclose the terms of the loan, including the periodic payment due, the total cost of the loan (all fee and interest payments plus principal), and the effective APR.

The CFPB hasn’t announced the rules yet. But the Times report indicated that the Bureau is considering an ability-to-repay standard. The CFPB may also include car title lenders in the regulation with the hope of reducing payday lenders’ ability to circumvent the rules. However, instead of requiring longer payment periods, the agency may instead limit the number of times a lender could roll over a borrower’s loan. In other words, borrowers may only be able to roll over the loan three or four times a year, preventing them from repeatedly paying the fee.

If the Bureau opts for that rule, it could limit the effectiveness of the law. “That kind of tries to tackle a problem of repeat borrowing and long-term borrowing but that’s a symptom,” Bourke said. “That’s not really the core disease. The core disease is unaffordable payments.” In addition, it could prevent a transparent market from emerging, as payday lenders continue to take advantage of borrowers’ ignorance over these loans. “The market will remain in this mire,” Burke added, “where it’s dominated by a deceptive balloon payment product that makes it difficult for consumers to make good choices but also makes it difficult for better types of lenders to compete with the more fair and transparent product.” Ultimately, that’s in the CFPB’s hands.

[…]

Borrower beware with payday loans | Globalnews.ca

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REGINA – It’s a quick way to get cash when you’re short before a payday. However, the Saskatchewan government wants people to think twice before borrowing money from a payday loan lender.

In Saskatchewan, lenders can charge up to $23.00 in interest and fees for every one-hundred dollars borrowed. On a four-hundred dollar loan, that adds up to $92.00.

Story continues below

The loan, plus interest and fees, is due on your next payday and is withdrawn automatically from your bank account. If a loan is defaulted, the lender can charge up to a maximum of 30 per cent per annum on the loan principle and up to $50.00 for a NSF cheque or if a pre-authorized debit is dishonoured.

IN DEPTH: Chequed out: Inside the payday loan cycle

“Sometimes people don’t have a lot of options when it comes to borrowing money,” says Cory Peters, the consumer credit division director for the Financial and Consumer Affairs Authority of Saskatchewan.

“We want to make sure that people are aware of the fees and re-payment timeframes that are associated with payday loans.”

A Global News analysis by Patrick Cain has found a striking correlation between payday lenders and low-income, high-social-assistance areas.

Payday loan stores and welfare rates »

Payday loan stores and welfare rates

Payday loan stores and income »

Payday loan stores and income

The Saskatchewan government has six tips for those using payday loans:

  1. Use a licensed Saskatchewan lender;
  2. Know the costs – frequent use adds up over time;
  3. Loans are due on your next regular payday;
  4. Don’t take out a second payday loan to pay for the first one;
  5. Read the fine print;
  6. If you change your mind, you have until the end of the next business day to return the money and cancel the loan.

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Singletary: What you should know before you take out a reverse mortgage

When you have most of your wealth tied up in your home, it’s referred to as being “house rich, cash poor.”

Many seniors who find themselves in this position may be enticed by the commercials offering salvation. They are wooed by a chance to tap into their home’s equity with a reverse mortgage. Smooth television ads make it appear to be a no-brainer. It’s actually much more complicated.

Michelle Singletary writes the nationally syndicated personal finance column, “The Color of Money.”

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The most appealing quality of this type of loan is that, unlike a traditional mortgage, you don’t have to make monthly payments. The lender doesn’t collect until the homeowner moves, sells or dies. Once the home is sold, any equity that remains after the loan is repaid is distributed to the person’s estate.

To qualify, you have to be 62 or older. The reverse-mortgage market isn’t huge — about 1 percent of all mortgages — but reverse-mortgage lenders are likely to pump up the volume in coming years as more seniors retire. For a lot of people, the only source of big money for them is the equity in their homes, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says.

In 2013, a typical household had only $111,000 in 401(k) or IRA savings, according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. The center found that too many people are dipping into their retirement accounts during their working years, causing what is called a “leakage.”

But a lot of seniors have equity in their homes — about $3.84 trillion, according to one mortgage-industry survey. They can tap into that equity by selling or taking out a home equity loan or line of credit. But selling isn’t an option if they want to stay put, and they would have to make payments on the line of credit or loan. Given those options, it’s no wonder a reverse mortgage can be appealing.

The CFPB, in a report analyzing 1,200 reverse-mortgage complaints received from 2011 to the end of last year, found that many people are confused about this type of loan.

The fact that counseling is required from a government-approved agency for loans made through the Federal Housing Administration’s Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program is an indication of the complexity of this financial product. Still, many seniors don’t understand what they are getting into.

People complained to the CFPB about their loan terms, the loan servicing companies and not being able to add a borrower. Adult children complained that lenders refused to add them as an additional borrower or allow them to “assume” the loan for an aging or deceased parent, the report said.

To help, the CFPB has issued some tips about reverse mortgages. Here are the three important things the agency says you or your relatives should know:

?Double check that your loan records accurately reflect who is on the mortgage.

?Be sure to understand the risks of not including a spouse on the loan. Often an older spouse will take out a reverse mortgage in his or her name only, because older homeowners are able to borrow against a greater percentage of the home’s equity.

“Non-borrowing spouses submit complaints distraught that they are facing foreclosure and about to lose their home after their husband or wife dies,” the report said. “Other non-borrowing spouses submit complaints worried about their ability to remain in their home should the older spouse die first.”

If you decide it’s financially better for just one spouse to take out a reverse mortgage, be sure to have a plan for the non-borrowing spouse. Can a surviving spouse stay in the home? The Department of Housing and Urban Development has attempted to address the issue of non-borrowing spouses. Under certain conditions, some spouses may be able to stay, but others may not get that protection.

The CFPB recommends that if only one spouse is on the mortgage, you should find out whether the loan servicer will permit the non-borrowing spouse to qualify for a repayment deferral allowing him or her to remain in the home.

?Talk to your heirs. If you have adult children or other relatives living in the house, be sure they understand what could happen if the reverse mortgage becomes due.

Go to the CFPB Web site at www.consumerfinance.gov and click the link for the agency’s consumer advisory on reverse mortgages.

There are some pros to a reverse mortgage. But the complexity of the product means you better be just as aware of the cons.

Readers may write to Michelle Singletary at The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 or michelle.singletary@washpost.com. To read previous Color of Money columns, go to http://wapo.st/michelle-singletary.

[…]

Payday Loan Rules from CFPB Receiving Increased Chatter; Could …

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Payday Loan Rules from CFPB Receiving Increased Chatter; Could be Announced Soon


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February 9, 2015http://www.insidearm.com/daily/collection-laws-regulations/collection-laws-and-regulations/payday-loan-rules-from-cfpb-receiving-increased-chatter-could-be-announced-soon/

The media chatter regarding the CFPB’s imminent rules for payday lenders was significantly ramped up early Monday as both The New York Times and the Associated Press ran separate but similar stories detailing what is likely to be in the rules.

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The timing of the two stories suggests that both outlets received information from the same sources with the CFPB and from consumer advocacy groups working with federal rules writers. It could signal that an announcement on the rules proposals is imminent.

The Times, in a piece titled “Consumer Protection Agency Seeks Limits on Payday Lenders,” details what those familiar with the discussion will likely be presented to the public. The new rules will focus on short-term loans, many backed by car titles, with annual interest rates over 36 percent.

One of the main new requirements will be that lenders assess whether a borrower can fully repay the loan over two weeks, the typical term for payday loans. Loan writers would be required to review borrower income, other debts, and payment history, similar to standards required by banks.

The Associated Press, in a similar piece titled “Rules readied to shield borrowers from payday loans,” noted that the CFPB is not allowed under law to cap interest rates, but it can use its UDAAP authority to target specific practices.

Similar to the Times piece, AP’s sources say that loan underwriting requirements will be featured in new rules.

The CFPB’s rules on payday lending are very important for the ARM industry. Payday loans are a large market segment for debt buyers and collectors. But it could also signal what kind of disruption is to be expected when the CFPB issues its rules specifically for the debt collection industry.

Debt collection rules, initially expected by the end of 2014, are now expected to be released late in the first quarter of 2015. It could be possible that the recent surge in news about payday lending rules may mean that those rule proposals will come before debt collection rules.

Depending on how far the CFPB rules use UDAAP justification versus statutory language, the ARM industry could also get a glimpse into how far away from the FDCPA new regulations may go.


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[…]

Tighter payday loan rules intended to shield debtors | TribLIVE

WASHINGTON — Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, federal regulators are putting together the first rules on payday loans aimed at helping cash-strapped borrowers avoid falling into a cycle of high-rate debt.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said state laws governing the $46 billion payday lending industry often fall short and that fuller disclosures of the interest and fees — often an annual percentage rate of 300 percent or more — may be needed.

Details of the proposed rules, expected early this year, would mark the first time the agency has used the authority it was given under the 2010 Dodd-Frank law to regulate payday loans. In recent months, it has tried to step up enforcement, including a $10 million settlement with ACE Cash Express, accusing the payday lender of harassing borrowers to collect debts and take out multiple loans.

A payday loan, or a cash advance, is generally $500 or less. Borrowers provide a personal check dated on their next payday for the full balance or give the lender permission to debit their bank accounts. The total includes charges often ranging from $15 to $30 per $100 borrowed. Interest-only payments, sometimes referred to as “rollovers,” are common.

Legislators in Ohio, Louisiana and South Dakota unsuccessfully tried to broadly restrict the high-cost loans in recent months. According to the Consumer Federation of America, 32 states now permit payday loans at triple-digit interest rates, or with no rate cap.

“Our research has found that what is supposed to be a short-term emergency loan can turn into a long-term and expensive debt trap,” said David Silberman, the bureau’s associate director for research, markets and regulation.

The agency is considering options that include establishing tighter rules to ensure a consumer has the ability to repay. That could mean requiring credit checks, placing caps on the number of times a borrower can draw credit or finding ways to encourage states or lenders to lower rates.

Payday lenders say they fill a vital need for people who hit a rough financial patch. They want a more equal playing field of rules for both nonbanks and banks, including the way the annual percentage rate is figured.

“We offer a service that, if managed correctly, can be very helpful to a diminished middle class,” said Dennis Shaul, chief executive of the Community Financial Services Association of America, which represents payday lenders.

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[…]

Weak economy set to spur Reserve Bank cash rate cut on Tuesday

Concern about deteriorating economic growth lies behind the Reserve Bank’s determination to cut interest rates, a move most likely at its first board meeting for the year on Tuesday.

A cut in the bank’s cash rate from 2.5 per cent to 2 per cent would bring the standard discounted home loan rate below 5 per cent, knocking $53 off the cost of servicing a $350,000 loan.

Although the latest official figures show Australia’s unemployment rate falling, the Reserve Bank’s preferred measure shows it continuing to climb.

The bank averages the unemployment rate for each quarter and compares it with the average for the previous quarter.

Board members will be told on Tuesday that over the past year the average unemployment rate has climbed from 5.9 per cent to 6 per cent to 6.1 per cent to 6.2 per cent. The averages mean that abstracted from monthly “noise” there has been no let up in the pace at which unemployment is climbing.

The board will be told economic growth figures released since it last met show the annualised pace of growth slipping from 3.6 per cent to 1.6 per cent in the space of six months.

The bank’s previous forecast of rising economic growth published in November is now regarded as out of date and will be revised when new forecasts are issued on Friday.

No lift in business confidence

Board members will be told that neither consumer nor business confidence has lifted since the budget, as would be needed for economic growth to climb back to its long-term trend.

Retail sales are solid but not spectacular, maintained by discounting and weighed down by low wage growth and rising unemployment.

Inflation provides no impediment to cutting rates. The headline rate is now just 1.7 per cent after the collapse in oil prices. Importantly, the bank expects lower oil prices to continue to weigh down on inflation as they feed through into a myriad other prices, something it did not expect late last year when it looked as if the collapse in the oil price would be less severe.

Rather than focusing on the unexpectedly high rate of so-called underlying inflation in the December quarter, the bank is paying special attention to the rate of inflation on so called “non-tradables” – products that are not internationally traded, which is well down on where it was a year ago, reflecting low wage growth and weak consumer demand.

“Tradables” inflation, the rate on products that are internationally traded, is now negative despite the lower dollar.

The bank is minded to cut its cash rate despite doubts about its effectiveness in boosting the economy. It is concerned that another cut may simply reignite the investor housing market and it fears it could fail in its objective of encouraging businesses and consumers to borrow and spend more. While a boost to the economy from the budget would be preferable, it isn’t likely.

Another impediment is the statement the bank released after its December board meeting, saying “the most prudent course is likely to be a period of stability in interest rates”.

The bank believes that enough has changed since December to release it from the commitment. The oil price has collapsed, economic growth has weakened, and the steam has gone out of inflation.

It believes that if it is clear it has to cut rates, there is little point in waiting. And it is also concerned that if it doesn’t cut when it is clear it should, the Australian dollar will head back up after dropping.

Canada has just cut its cash rate to 0.75 per cent. Denmark has just cut its rate to minus 0.5 per cent. The United States is keeping its rate at 0.25 per cent. An Australian cash rate maintained at 2.5 per cent in the face of these moves would give the dollar support the bank would prefer it not to have.

The final decision will up be made by the nine members of the board, including the newly appointed treasury secretary John Fraser, who will meet in Sydney on Tuesday.

If they decide to keep the cash rate at 2.5 per cent in the face of recent developments, they are likely to indicate they intend to cut it soon, in March. But it is more likely that they will cut on Tuesday.

Peter Martin is economics editor of The Age.

Twitter: @1petermartin

The story Weak economy set to spur Reserve Bank cash rate cut on Tuesday first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.

[…]

Regulators prepare rules on payday loans to shield borrowers

WASHINGTON (AP) — Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, federal regulators are putting together the first-ever rules on payday loans aimed at helping cash-strapped borrowers avoid falling into a cycle of high-rate debt.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says state laws governing the $46 billion payday lending industry often fall short, and that fuller disclosures of the interest and fees — often an annual percentage rate of 300 percent or more — may be needed.

Full details of the proposed rules, expected early this year, would mark the first time the agency has used the authority it was given under the 2010 Dodd-Frank law to regulate payday loans. In recent months, it has tried to step up enforcement, including a $10 million settlement with ACE Cash Express after accusing the payday lender of harassing borrowers to collect debts and take out multiple loans.

A payday loan, or a cash advance, is generally $500 or less. Borrowers provide a personal check dated on their next payday for the full balance or give the lender permission to debit their bank accounts. The total includes charges often ranging from $15 to $30 per $100 borrowed. Interest-only payments, sometimes referred to as “rollovers,” are common.

Legislators in Ohio, Louisiana and South Dakota unsuccessfully tried to broadly restrict the high-cost loans in recent months. According to the Consumer Federation of America, 32 states now permit payday loans at triple-digit interest rates, or with no rate cap at all.

The CFPB isn’t allowed under the law to cap interest rates, but it can deem industry practices unfair, deceptive or abusive to consumers.

“Our research has found that what is supposed to be a short-term emergency loan can turn into a long-term and expensive debt trap,” said David Silberman, the bureau’s associate director for research, markets and regulation. The bureau found more than 80 percent of payday loans are rolled over or followed by another loan within 14 days; half of all payday loans are in a sequence at least 10 loans long.

The agency is considering options that include establishing tighter rules to ensure a consumer has the ability to repay. That could mean requiring credit checks, placing caps on the number of times a borrower can draw credit or finding ways to encourage states or lenders to lower rates.

Payday lenders say they fill a vital need for people who hit a rough financial patch. They want a more equal playing field of rules for both nonbanks and banks, including the way the annual percentage rate is figured.

“We offer a service that, if managed correctly, can be very helpful to a diminished middle class,” said Dennis Shaul, chief executive of the Community Financial Services Association of America, which represents payday lenders.

Maranda Brooks, 40, a records coordinator at a Cleveland college, says she took out a $500 loan through her bank to help pay an electricity bill. With “no threat of loan sharks coming to my house, breaking kneecaps,” she joked, Brooks agreed to the $50 fee.

Two weeks later, Brooks says she was surprised to see the full $550 deducted from her usual $800 paycheck. To cover expenses for herself and four children, she took out another loan, in a debt cycle that lasted nearly a year.

“It was a nightmare of going around and around,” said Brooks, who believes that lenders could do more to help borrowers understand the fees or offer lower-cost installment payments.

Last June, the Ohio Supreme Court upheld a legal maneuver used by payday lenders to skirt a 2008 law that capped the payday loan interest rate at 28 percent annually. By comparison, annual percentage rates on credit cards can range from about 12 percent to 30 percent.

Members of Congress also are looking at payday loans.

Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the top Democrat on the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, plans legislation that would allow Americans to receive an early refund of a portion of their earned income tax credit as an alternative to a payday loan.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wants the U.S. Postal Service to offer check-cashing and low-cost small loans. The idea is opposed by many banks and seems unlikely to advance in a Republican-controlled Congress.

___

Follow Hope Yen on Twitter at http://twitter.com/hopeyen1

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Cash America Announces New Share Repurchase Authorization for up to 4 Million Shares

FORT WORTH, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Cash America International, Inc. (CSH) announced today that its board of directors, at its regularly scheduled meeting, authorized the repurchase of up to 4.0 million shares of the Company’s outstanding common stock, par value $0.10 per share. The share repurchase authorization does not have an expiration date, and the amount and prices paid for any future share purchases under the new authorization will be based on market conditions and other factors at the time of the purchase. Repurchases under the share repurchase program will be made through open market purchases or private transactions, in accordance with applicable federal securities laws. This new authorization cancels and replaces a previous authorization to purchase up to 2.5 million shares of common stock, under which approximately 41% of the authorized shares had been repurchased as of December 31, 2014.

Repurchased shares will be held as treasury stock for general corporate purposes. As of December 31, 2014, there were approximately 29 million shares of Cash America common stock issued and outstanding; therefore, the new authorization represents approximately 14% of the currently issued and outstanding shares of common stock.

In a separate release today, the Company also announced that its board of directors increased the quarterly cash dividend to 5 cents per share from 3.5 cents per share. The dividend will be payable on February 25, 2015 to shareholders of record on February 11, 2015. See the separate press release for additional details.

About the Company

As of December 31, 2014 Cash America International, Inc. (the “Company”) operated 943 total locations offering specialty financial services to consumers, which included the following:

859 lending locations in 21 states in the United States primarily under the names “Cash America Pawn,” “SuperPawn,” “Cash America Payday Advance,” and “Cashland;” and 84 check cashing centers (all of which are unconsolidated franchised check cashing centers) operating in 12 states in the United States under the name “Mr. Payroll.”

For additional information regarding Cash America International, Inc. visit its website located at www.cashamerica.com.

Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995

This release contains forward-looking statements about the business, financial condition, operations and prospects of the Company. The actual results of the Company could differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements because of various risks and uncertainties including, without limitation: the effect of, compliance with or changes in domestic pawn, consumer credit, tax and other laws and governmental rules and regulations applicable to the Company’s business or changes in the interpretation or enforcement thereof; the regulatory and examination authority of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, including the effect of and compliance with a consent order the Company entered into with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in November 2013; risks related to the separation of the Company and Enova International, Inc.; a claim relating to the terms of the Company’s 5.75% senior notes; the actions of third parties who provide, acquire or offer products and services to, from or for the Company; public and regulatory perception of the Company’s business, including its consumer loan business and its business practices; the effect of any current or future litigation proceedings or any judicial decisions or rule-making that affect the Company, its products or its arbitration agreements; fluctuations, including a sustained decrease, in the price of gold or deterioration in economic conditions; a prolonged interruption in the Company’s operations of its facilities, systems and business functions, including its information technology and other business systems; changes in demand for the Company’s services and changes in competition; impairment risk related to the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets; the Company’s ability to attract and retain qualified executive officers; the ability of the Company to open new locations in accordance with its plans or to successfully integrate newly acquired businesses into the Company’s operations; interest rate fluctuations; changes in the capital markets, including the debt and equity markets; changes in the Company’s ability to satisfy its debt obligations or to refinance existing debt obligations or obtain new capital to finance growth; security breaches, cyber-attacks or fraudulent activity; acts of God, war or terrorism, pandemics and other events; the effect of any of such changes on the Company’s business or the markets in which it operates; and other risks and uncertainties indicated in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. These risks and uncertainties are beyond the ability of the Company to control, nor can the Company predict, in many cases, all of the risks and uncertainties that could cause its actual results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements. When used in this release, terms such as “believes,” “estimates,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “plans,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “may,” “forecasts,” “projects” and similar expressions and variations as they relate to the Company or its management are intended to identify forward-looking statements. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this release.

FinanceInvestment & Company Information Contact:

Cash America International, Inc.
Thomas A. Bessant, Jr., 817-335-1100

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